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FeuerTRUTZ-International-2-2016

Planning and Concepts Fig. 6: Application of an epoxy fire protection system before installation created on-site with extensive effort by respective casings and air conditioning. The application requires special equipment (see figure 7),a respective certification of the person who applicates and finally, a high level of special knowledge which makes the number of the certified users is manageable. The material can be applied by hand or sprayed on airless where most systems cannot do without a reinforcement mesh that is inserted into the coating (wet at that time). Only a few systems do without this mesh, at least with individual versions. There is a new system on the market that, in accordance with ANSI/UL 1709, gives up to 240 minutes protection according to the HC curve without mesh. A great benefit in doing so is that this system can be adapted to the fire-resistance duration (e.g. from HC 90 to HC 180) by increasing the coating thickness. This is frequently not possible on classical systems as the mesh must be inserted at a determined position (e.g. in the middle of the overall thickness). Hydrocarbon coatings on a cementicious basis These systems remaind standard on onshore petrochemical plants for many years. The frequently more cost effective initial installation costs compared to the epoxy fire protection coatings prompted system operators to use these systems. They are mostly based on a basis of Portland cement with an aggregate of Perlite, Vermiculite or mineral fibre. Using these Fig. 7: Airless application system for epoxy fire protection systems aggregates allows a higher heat resistance to be achieved by an equally low raw density and can therefore reduce the layer thickness. A greater disadvantage of this systems is its tendency to crack formation. If water penetrates, spalling may occur from the influence of frost. Another danger is the risk of corrosion resulting from the metallic substrate, that must be protected. If the moisture settles over a longer period, the feared corrosion under insulation (C.U.I.) may occur. In worst case, the stability of the system may be severely affected. It is therefore important to provide a sufficient weather protection in the outside area of these systems in the form of a special coating or lining using sheet metal. Due to the problems previously explained, the current trend is towards epoxy fire protection systems. Linings in the form of panels are usually found in the petrochemical industry on supporting constructions with perpendicular angled parts or in the area of large level surfaces. As long as they are weather resistant and have a respective approval for use in the petrochemical sector, there is no objection to their use. These linings are a problem if water should penetrate behind the lining and causes damage to the steel. Conclusion The report refers to the high technical fire protection requirements in the petrochemical industry and represents a selection of possible systems. The following recognition is however, much more important that the comparison of the individual systems: if, during the protective objective consideration, it arises that one has to expect a hydrocarbon fire scenario, irrelevant if this is a Pool-Fire or Jet-Fire, systems tested according to the cellulosic fire curve are generally out of place. Especially intumescent coating systems for the classical structural steelwork is overstrained technically with the rapid increase in temperature with hydrocarbon fires. ■ Literatur 1 UL 1709 „Standard for Rapid Rise Fire Tests of Protection Materials for Structural Steel”, 08.03.2011 Authors Jörg Römer Fire protection technical expert, active in sales of fire protection systems at KAEFER Montage GmbH; project coordination for the gas storage facility Peckensen project Michael Wiese active in sales of fire protection systems at KAEFER Montage GmbH; responsible for the coating sector 8 FeuerTRUTZ International 2.2016


FeuerTRUTZ-International-2-2016
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